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The Road by Cormac McCarthy December 29, 2009

Posted by KJ theBookGirl in review.
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The Road by Cormac McCarthy

McCarthy’s The Road is brilliant. Simply brilliant. The plot follows a man and his son as they travel along a road south after what seems to be an apocalyptic event. It ventures to question the fundamental survival instincts of human nature, wondering how far we would go to keep ours and our own alive.

The style of this novel is truly original. With no punctuation other than the trusty full stop, and no elaborate descriptions or unnecessary words, the story is kept to basics, conveying a true raw power of the message and plot of this story.

McCarthy is surely one of the greatest writers of our time, for the strength and force of his tale are beyond most literature of our century.

The story unfolds as the man and his son discover awful things that other humans have done; see scarring sights that no one should have to see. Their journey, of hardship, of poverty, of hunger; shows the relationship between a man and a boy who have absolutely nothing but one another.

This shows the pure reliance each have on the other, the dependence for encouragement when there is no hope, the dependence for love when there is nothing else.

McCarthy explores how lives could change in such a cataclysmic event that no one can be trusted to be a “good guy”…but also how a leap of faith to that trust could be worth it if only it was tried. The risks are numerous and so the man and his son must struggle to survive alone in this powerful, man eat man world where nature has taken it’s revenge.

The emotional journey the characters go on shows the hardship of a hopeless eternity, and the contrast between the young and the old, the trusting and the suspicious, the want to help and the action of help.

McCarthy’s only downfall is, perhaps, the length of the novel. It is not particularly long or short for a novel, but it seems the events can get a little repetitive in that nothing changes. Perhaps this is the point – the characters have nothing and never will have anything, with every day for eternity a struggle to survive. But sometimes it seems that a different or speedier occurrence would be welcome.

In conclusion, this excellent novel of McCarthy’s seems destined to be an eternal classic of our time. It is a must read for it’s messages and ideas are so deep, that even if not fully understood, they should be attempted and savoured, for it is full of lessons for humankind to learn.

KJ
theBookGirl

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